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공공기관 최초 UNWTO 수상 (’14. 1. 22)

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Suwon Hwasung

Gyeonggi-do Suwon-si

Suwon Hwasung

Gyeonggi-do Suwon-si

Paldalmun This is the southern gate of the Suwon Hwaseong Fortress, ‘Paldalmun’. The name ‘Paldal’ has the interesting meaning of “being open to all directions”. The Paldalmun was built in order to protect the Hwaseong Fortress. It had a semicircle shaped Ongseong standing on the outside, and had a device that allowed soldiers to dump hot water on enemies climbing the wall. When the Hwaseong Fortress was being constructed, there was a policy which required people involved in the construction to engrave their names on the building. It was to give pride to those working for the construction of the fortress. Their names were engraved on the buildings, and the outer stone wall of the Paldalmun. You can check the engraved names and numbers of the people who built the gate. As a representative palace gate of the second half of the Joseon Dynasty, the Paldalmun has been designated a National Treasure No.402.

National Museum of Korea

Seoul Yongsan-gu

National Museum of Korea

Seoul Yongsan-gu

The Paleolithic Age, the First Culture in History We have now arrived in the Paleolithic Room. During the Paleolithic Age, humans started to use fire, invented tools, and developed a culture. The first humans inhabited Korea from about 700,000 years ago. They were hunter-gatherers and led a nomadic lifestyle, moving from place to place to find sufficient food and seeking shelter in caves or on the banks of rivers. The people of the Paleolithic Age initially used natural stones as tools, but gradually began to break and shape them to remove their efficiency. Large, clumsy tools were used at first, but over time the tools were refined and a variety of sharper and smaller tools were developed for different purposes. During the later period of the Paleolithic Age, the stone tools were used in conjunction with pieces of timber or horn. As stone working techniques became even more developed, it was possible to reproduce the same tool.

Gyeongju National Museum

Gyeongsangbuk-do Gyeongju-si

Gyeongju National Museum

Gyeongsangbuk-do Gyeongju-si

History of Earthenware and Stone Tools of the Prehistoric Age We are now in the first room of the museum. This room is filled with stone tools and earthenware used by the Prehistoric occupants of the Korean Peninsula, long before the establishment of the Silla kingdom. The beginning of Prehistoric Age of Korea dates way back to around 500,000 B.C., and many traces of early human habitation have been found from this period. From the exhibits in this room, we can see the technological development of the various stone tools and earthenware items. And with this information we can understand the lifestyles of the peninsula’s ancient inhabitants. Ground stone tools of the Neolithic Period, for example, indicate the beginnings of agriculture in Korea. We can also see how people cooked and stored grains. The earthenware vessel in the middle of the room has a pointed base that is typical of artifacts dating from the Neolithic Period in Korea. While this type of clay earthenware was manufactured all over the world during the Neolithic Period, Korean vessels are distinguished by patterns of lines incised into the clay. The patterns were made by drawing or pressing the surface with a comb-like implement. In the Bronze Age, more sophisticated tools were invented, and this made people’s lives easier. Earthenware from this age is characterized by a flat base and plain surface and is simple and practical. But in the Late Bronze Age, a more decorative and sophisticated style was introduced from China. We can see these exhibits in the big glass cases which lead us into the next room.

THE INDEPENDENCE HALL OF KOREA

Chungcheongnam-do Cheonan-si

THE INDEPENDENCE HALL OF KOREA

Chungcheongnam-do Cheonan-si

You have just entered Exhibit Hall No. 1, The Origin of the Korean People. This hall shows how Koreans endeavored to keep their history, culture and the grounds of their history and culture. Now, you will see a film introducing the country’s long history. We hope that this will be a nice opportunity for you to see how the country’s history and culture have developed.

Yangdong Village

Gyeongsangbuk-do Gyeongju-si

Yangdong Village

Gyeongsangbuk-do Gyeongju-si

Gyeongju is the home of Shilla culture. But even here in Gyeongju, there is a place with deep Confucian roots that run all the way back to the Joseon Dynasty. That place is none other than Yangdong Village. Registered as a World Heritage Site in 2010, along with Hahoe Folk Village in Andong, Yangdong Village was the largest aristocratic village during the Joseon Dynasty. Today, the village serves as the home village for clans such as the Lee family (originally from Yeogang) and the Son family (originally from Wolseong). These two families have coexisted harmoniously, often as in-laws, for a very long time. Location-wise, Yangdong Village sits in one of the four best locations in Korea according to the book “Taeriji.” It perfectly conforms to the well-known “fengshui” theory of “Baesanimsu” which means having a mountain to the north and body of water to the south. In fact, a river called “Gigyecheon” (tributary of Hyeongsangang River) flows through the southern edges of the river. Records indicate that Gigyecheon was wide enough in the past for fishing boats to sail all the way up to the village. Can you imagine women gathering around to buy some fish when boats from faraway cities like Pohang or Ulsan would make port at Yangdong Village? Yangdong Village is closer to Pohang than Gyeongju. Naturally, some descendants of the Lee family (originally from Yeogang) have relocated to Pohang to create another village for the clan. One of those villages is Deokdong Cultural Village. When you visit Yangdong Village, you have to make sure you explore all the way into the inner sections of the Village. That is because “Seobaekdang,” the oldest house in Korea, sits in the heart of the village. Renowned scholars during the Joseon Dynasty such as “Woojae” Son Jung-don and “Hoejae” Yi Eon-jeok were both born in Seobaekdang. Experts say that Yangdong village is located on such an auspicious piece of land, that the vvVillage is destined to produce three great scholars. They still have room for one more, so that gives the villagers a reason to look forward to the future. Yangdong Village is home to some extremely well-preserved and maintained old houses that belie their age - some are 600 years old. Not only that, but descendants of the original owners still live in some of the houses. You can say the village is still thriving and very much moving forward . If you take your time and walk along the village streets, you might get the feeling that the old houses are talking to you. It might also be a great idea to cross the Angang field adjacent to the village, and visit Dongnakdang Hall and Oksanseowon Confucian Academy. If you plan on visiting Gyeongju, how about spending half a day away from the city to feel and breathe in the energy of the most auspicious village in Korea?

Jongmyo

Seoul Jongno-gu

Jongmyo

Seoul Jongno-gu

UNESCO World Heritage Site The Jongmyo Shrine is where JongmyoJerye, or the Royal Ancestral Rite, is performed to commemorate the life and legacy of the Joseon kings and their queen consorts. The shrine is on a site seven times larger than a soccer field and consists of a number of buildings including the two main shrine buildings, Jeongjeon, or the Main Shrine Hall, and Yeongnyeongjeon, Hall of Everlasting Peace. The extraordinary cultural and historical value of the shrine earned it a spot on the UNESCO World Heritage Sites list in 1995. Similar legacies were preserved in Asian countries with Confucian traditions, China and Vietnam in particular, but it is only the Jongmyo Shrine that the original memorial ritual is held still today by the descendants of the royals whose spirit tablets were enshrined. In addition to the shrine, the memorial rite regularly held at the shrine and the music and dance performed for the rite were also proclaimed by UNESCO as Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. You can see a paved path called Samdo, or Triple-lane Road, starting just inside the entrance gate to the Main Shrine Hall. The path was used only when the ancestral memorial rite took place by the king and the crown prince who were to take the eastern and western lane respectively. The central lane was used only by the royal ancestral spirits whose mortuary tablets were housed in the shrine and the chief ritual officiant carrying incense to the shrine.

Haeinsa

Gyeongsangnam-do Hapcheon-gun

Haeinsa

Gyeongsangnam-do Hapcheon-gun

The Road to the Haeinsa Temple [Narration] Welcome to the Haeinsa Temple. You will now start a 1.5km-long walk from this parking lot to the One Pillar Gate, the temple's outermost entrance gate. As you walk from here to the temple, don't forget to feast your eyes on the stunningly scenic views of the Gayasan National Park. Listen, and you can hear the melodious sounds of water running along the exquisite rocky valley on your left. The valley has fascinated visitors with colorful views that continue to change with the seasons. The scenic beauty of the valley with its surroundings has given it two nicknames. Ongnyudong, or Jade Brook Valley, came from the famous valley of the same name in Geumgangsan which is often regarded as the most beautiful mountain in the entire Korean Peninsula. The other, Hongnyudong, or Vermillion Brook Valley, came from the views of autumn colored trees reflected on the water running through the valley. The Buddhist temple of Haeinsa is situated in the depth of the Gayasan National Park which contains breathtakingly beautiful peaks and valleys. It has long been regarded as an epitome of human spiritual growth in perfect harmony with nature. Haeinsa has been admired as one of Korea's most valuable Buddhist treasures since its foundation some twelve thousand years ago. But before we visit the temple, why don't we ask one of its monks to give us a brief introduction? [Buddhist priest in Haeinsa] "Haeinsa was established about twelve hundred years ago. It has since grown into one of the three most important Buddhist sanctuaries in Korea. Korean Buddhism has the Three Jewels represented by three main temples, Tongdosa, Songgwangsa and Haeinsa. The First Jewel of Korean Buddhism is the "true relics" of the historical Buddha, or Shakyamuni, housed in Tongdosa in Yangsan. The Second Jewel is the community of Buddhist monks symbolized by Songgwangsa which has produced sixteen eminent monks representing spiritual maturity of Korean Buddhism. Finally, the Third Jewel is the dharma, or the Buddhist law, represented by the immense scriptural collection known as the Tripitaka Koreana. This collection of over eighty thousand scriptural woodblocks is currently housed in two special depositaries in Haeinsa. It is largely this treasure that makes Haeinsa stand out from other great Buddhist sanctuaries across Korea. And that is why some even argue that Haeinsa is the history of Korean Buddhism itself."

Haemieupseong

Chungcheongnam-do Seosan-si

Haemieupseong

Chungcheongnam-do Seosan-si

Haemieupseong Walled Town was built around the bottom of Jinesan Hill, connected to the west side of Seongmunbong Peak of Gayasan Mountain. Construction of the fortress began during the Joseon period in 1417, under the reign of King Taejong, and was initially completed in 1421, under the reign of King Sejong, to defend against attack from Japanese invaders. The entire complex was completed in 1491, under the reign of King Seongjong. The fortress is 4.9 meters in height, 1,800 meters in length, and the area of the walled town of the old barracks is 190,000 square meters. Of the original gates, the East and West Gates were destroyed, to be reconstructed in 1974; only the South Gate Jinnammun has been kept in its original form; the North Gate is an auxiliary gate. Jinnammun Gate is a rainbow-shaped arched gate, on which is a three-kan-wide, two-story pavilion with a hip-and-gable roof. The signboard of Jinnammun Gate was written by Yi Jin-baek, who was a county magistrate of Taean from Yeomi-ri, Unsan, well-known for his righteousness and calligraphy. Lots of people from Chungcheong-do were mobilized for the construction of the fortress, and under Jinnammun Gate is an engraved phrase that reads it was built by the people from Gongju. Haemieupseong Walled Town is Historic Site no.116 and Must-visit Destination of Seosan no.1 out of nine. Also, it is one of the three well-preserved walled towns in South Korea.

Bukchon

Seoul Jongno-gu

Bukchon

Seoul Jongno-gu

Beautiful Hanok Village in Downtown Seoul Welcome to Bukchon. Bukchon, which is located near Gyeongbokgung Palace, Changdeokgung Palace and Jongmyo Shrine, refers to the upper town of Jongno and Cheonggyecheon Stream. In the early days of the Joseon Dynasty, the northern and southern towns of the area were called “Bukchon” and “Namchon,” respectively. Now, Bukchon is one of the most famous tourist spots in Seoul. The question is why? It is home to about 1,000 hanoks that represent the traditional beauty of Korea. These hanoks are located in old alleys. Bukchon is also called a “museum in the urban core,” with lots of historic sites, cultural properties and folk relics. You can learn and experience Korean traditional culture at various exhibition halls, museums and craft workshops. Guess who lived in these hanoks? In the Joseon Dynasty, royal and upper class families lived there, as Bukchon was near two palaces. It was also the ideal place to live according to the Feng Shui theory, with Cheonggyecheon Stream in front and Bukaksan Mountain behind it. You can plan your trip to Bukchon around “Eight Scenic Views,” the best photo spots with beautiful scenery. This guide will focus on these eight spots. Before starting your trip, please keep in mind that people live in these hanoks. Please do not peep into a house or make noise in the alleys. Now let’s begin our journey to Bukchon!

Korean Culinary Culture Exhibition Hall

Seoul Jung-gu

Korean Culinary Culture Exhibition Hall

Seoul Jung-gu

Korean Culinary Culture Exhibition Hall "Korean Culinary Culture Exhibition Hall" next to Cheonggyecheon Stream is a place where you can learn about the food Korea’s ancestors ate. It exudes an atmosphere of the old days from its entrance, which exactly reproduces traditional wood joining techniques used to build Hanok without nails to connect joints. Between the wood columns, which represent the pillars and ridgepole of Hanok, the subdivisions of the seasons are introduced on the right wall and the seasonal customs and food that our ancestors ate are on each subdivision of the left paper windows. Korea’s ancestors lived by practicing agriculture for a long time, so the change of seasons was very important. They divided a year into 24 seasonal divisions and cooked food with ingredients produced in that seasonal subdivision. This food is called seasonal subdivision food, while those cooked with ingredients produced in each season are called seasonal food. In particular, people ate rice cake soup on New Year’s Day, steamed five grains on Jeongwol Daeboreum, the day of the first full moon of the lunar calendar, rice cakes made with marsh plants on Dano when positive energy, yang, is at its strongest for the year, and half-moon rice cakes on Chuseok, Korea’s Thanksgiving Day when people bear abundant grains and fruit. In addition to food, there were seasonal customs practiced repeatedly at the same time every year. For example, people hung bamboo-woven strainers called Bokjori on New Year’s Day, bit on a nut to ward off boils on Jeongwol Daeboreum, played on a swing on Dano, and held a memorial service for ancestors with freshly harvested grain on Chuseok. Village communities could live in harmony and keep peace and well-being with these food and customs in seasonal subdivisions.

Wolbongseowon

Gwangju Gwangsan-gu

Wolbongseowon

Gwangju Gwangsan-gu

Wolbongseowon Confucian Academy, where Tribute is Paid to the Thoughts and Life of Gi Dae-seung Wolbongseowon Confucian Academy was built to pay tribute to the thoughts and life of Gi Dae-seung (penname: Gobong), a Confucian scholar of the Joseon Dynasty. He contributed greatly to the development of Neo-Confucianism with his extraordinary enthusiasm. There is a well-known story that he had a philosophical argument with Yi Hwang (penname: Toegye) and they exchanged 120 letters over 13 years. In 1578 (the 11th year of King Seonjo), seven years after he passed away, local Confucian scholars built Mangcheonsa Shrine to hold memorial rites for him. The shrine was damaged during Imjinwaeran (the Japanese Invasion of Joseon) and was moved to the current location via Dongcheon (now Sanwol-dong). It took on the appearance of a prestigious Seowon (Confucian academy) after King Hyojong named it “Wolbong” and put a signboard on it in 1654. Although it was demolished under an order of Heungseon Daewongun to eliminate Confucian academies (1868), it was restored starting with Bingwoldang Hall in 1941, followed by Oesammun (three outer gates), Jangpangak and Naesammun (three inner gates). After looking around Wolbongseowon Confucian Academy, walk along Philosopher's Trail and visit the tomb of Gi. The 10-minute walk is beautiful, as the pine forest and bamboo grove go well together.

Jeonju Hanok Village

Jeollabuk-do Jeonju-si

Jeonju Hanok Village

Jeollabuk-do Jeonju-si

Seunggwangjae [Narration] Seunggwangjae means ‘the house succeeded to light’. The ‘light’ refers to the name of an era of the Korean Empire, ‘Gwangmu’ (Gwang meaning light in Korean). Upon entering the house, the tinkling of a wind-chime under the eaves offers a warm welcome. There are a few framed pictures and writings under the eaves. One of them is an autographed letter from King Gojong at Gyeongwun Palace, dated 1905, asking the French President to help expose Japan’s aggressive denouncement of Korea’s autonomy and the independence of the Joseon Dynasty. Another framed picture is of Euiwang, the fifth son of King Gojong, in his youth. Do you wonder why these things are exhibited here? Seunggwangjae is a themed living center managed by the Royal Family Support Group. Jeonju City purchased four private houses in 2004 and built this small traditional house for the last imperial grandson of Joseon, Yi Seok. The owner of Seunggwangjae, Yi Seok, is the 11th son of Euiwang. [M] ‘House of Dove’ by Yi Seok The popular melody, ‘House of Dove’, is sung by Yi Seok. He was once a famous pop singer in Korea. Seunggwangjae is used not only as the living space of Yi Seok, but also a traditional Hanok house experience facility.

Bomunsa

Incheon Ganghwa-gun

Bomunsa

Incheon Ganghwa-gun

Introduction “After setting out from Oepori Dock in Ganghwa-do Province and cleaving water for 10 minutes, Seokmo-do Island comes into view. Bomunsa Temple on Nakgasan Mountain can be reached after traveling through the countryside amongst a cool sea breeze for about eight kilometers.” “Along with Boriam Hermitage in Guemsan Mountain of the South Sea, and Hongnyeonam Hermitage of Yangyang County of the East Sea, Bomunsa Temple is considered one of the three sacred Gwaneum or Avalokiteshvara sites. The Avalokiteshvara sites are traditional temples within which Gwaneum, or the Bodhisattva of Great Compassion, is believed to reside.” “Bomunsa Temple, or the virtuous door temple, reaches everyone without discrimination, and saves sentient beings in all forms through the teachings of the Buddha.” “Surrounded by beautiful landscape, and accompanied by a magical tale of ardent prayers that will be granted at the sacred site according to Gwaneum belief, Bomunsa receives an endless procession of visitors.”

Naksansa

Gangwon-do Yangyang-gun

Naksansa

Gangwon-do Yangyang-gun

The Legend of Naksansa [Visitor] I heard that there is a legend about Naksansa. [Curator] As one of the three major temples for the Gwaneum belief system in Korea, Naksansa originated from Mount Potalaka in India, where Gwansaeum Bosal, the Bodhisattva of Great Compassion resides. During the Unified Silla Dynasty period (668-993), when Grand Master Uisang (624-702) had just come from his study during the Tang Dynasty (618-907), he heard that one part of the collection of the Bodhisattva of Great Compassion’s relics was in a cave near Naksan, on the east coast. At the entrance to the cave, he prayed for seven days. Yet, he wasn’t able to meet the Bodhisattva of Great Compassion. So, he just plunged into the water, blaming himself. Then, suddenly, the eight supernatural guardians of the Buddha-dharma appeared and led the way to the cave. Finally, he entered the cave and paid homage. Upon doing this, a water dragon of the east appeared and gave him a set of crystal Buddhist prayer beads and a Mani-gem, magic bead. With these jewels, he offered his prayers for seven more days. On the seventh day, the Bodhisattva of Great Compassion came to him and commanded, “Two bamboo trees will grow right on top of this spot where you are. Build a dharma hall there.” Just like the bodhisattva said, two bamboo trees came out of that very spot. So, he enshrined them and named the temple Naksansa, placing the crystal prayer beads and the magic bead on the altar.

Jeondong Catholic Church

Jeollabuk-do Jeonju-si

Jeondong Catholic Church

Jeollabuk-do Jeonju-si

Jeondong Catholic Church [Narration] Our walking tour begins here, at Jeondong Catholic Church, which is located to the right of Taejo-ro signpost. Please note that the church is only open from 9am to 6pm. Jeondong Catholic Church is the largest and oldest modern western building in Jeolla Province. Located amongst the traditional houses of the Hanok Village, the church has a mystical atmosphere. It is a grand, beautiful piece of architecture and features curved lines, unusual and rare in Korea. With the bell tower in the center and small belfries on each side, this solid building looks exceedingly grand. Most visitors are busy taking photos of this picturesque building, but the building’s hidden history enhances its beauty. The secrets begin to be revealed near the wall behind the reception area to the right of the entrance. A stone monument engraved, ‘The first martyrdom place in Korea’, stands in the flower garden by the walls. The inscription refers to two pioneering Catholic martyrs, Jichung Yun and Sangyeon Gwon, who were executed at Pungnam Gate in the days when Catholicism was not accepted in Korea. The soil and stones from Pungnam Gate, soaked with the blood of the two martyrs, were used as the cornerstones on which Jeondong Catholic Church was built. The founder of Jeondong Catholic Church is French Father Xavier Baudonet. A bust sculpture of him stands in the garden on your left. The missionary Xavier Baudonet served as provost for 26 years from 1889 at Jeondong Catholic Church, and he is truly believed to be the ‘Father’ of the church.

Namdaemun Market

Seoul

Namdaemun Market

Seoul

600-year-old Traditional Market In 1414, Joseon Dynasty’s King Taejong established a market in the Namdaemun area of the Seoul City Wall where circulation of goods and commodities was greatest. The government built shops around Namdaemun and rented out the shops to traders. Word spread very fast and soon enough, the market thrived with merchants and goods from around the nation. In the wake of the Korean War, items from American military bases including chocolates, army supplies, cameras, watches, and other imported goods began to circulate secretly in the market. Whenever officers would enter the market, traders would instantly pack up and disappear. Over a period of 40 years, the city of Seoul redeveloped and modernized the market little by little. New buildings were erected, and the Namdaemun Market you see today was completed in 2005. The Namdaemun Market houses over 10,000 shops that carry mostly children’s clothing, accessories, eye glasses and cameras. But with the increasing number of foreign tourists, shops selling traditional Korean goods like dried seaweed and ginseng have also increased. The back alleys lined with delicious eateries also attract plenty of visitors. Home-made noodle soup, braised cutlass fish, king-sized dumplings, and fried fish cakes are just a few of the mouthwatering dishes you’ll find here.

Buseoksa

Chungcheongnam-do Seosan-si

Buseoksa

Chungcheongnam-do Seosan-si

Located at Dobisan Mountain in Chwipyeong-ri, Buseok-myeon, Seosan-si, Buseoksa Temple was established in 677 by the Buddhist monk Uisang of Silla and later rebuilt by the Buddhist monk Muhak. The record of its construction was found in the crossbeam of Geungnakjeon Hall during the reconstruction of the hall in 1995. The bronze-gilded Avalokitesvara Bodhisattva, which was enshrined in Buseoksa Temple in 1330, the late Goryeo period, had been brought from Tsushima Island of Japan into South Korea without proper process, resulting in a pending legal issue. The Geungnakjeon Hall, Yosachae Dormitory, Anyangnu Pavilion, Simgeomdang Hall and Muryangsugak Hall are found in Buseoksa Temple, and therein are enshrined the statues of the Amitayus Buddha, Avalokiteshvara Bodhisattva, Mahasthamaprapta Bodhisattva, and Ksitigarbha Bodhisattva. Drawing the attention of tourists with its beautiful natural environment, Buseoksa Temple also offers temple-stay programs. Dobisan Mountain, where Buseoksa Temple is located, used to be the gangmu site where King Taejong and his third son Prince Chungnyeong held military training events (gangmu refers to the hunting contest for military training that was attended by the king).

Namsangol Hanok Village

Seoul

Namsangol Hanok Village

Seoul

Discovering the Joseon Lifestyle at a Traditional Korean Village Namsangol Hanok Village was created by bringing in five traditional Korean houses over a period of four years since 1933, and then landscaping traditional gardens around them. Three pavilions named Cheonugak, Gwaneojeong and Cheongnyujeong were also built for people to rest and enjoy the view. A traditional Korean music hall was also built so that visitors could listen to traditional music during their visit. This place used to be called “Cheonghakdong,” which literally translates to “blue-green crane,” referring to the beautiful green nature that surrounds the village. During the Joseon era, scholars and aristocrats would walk around the pavilions and houses while enjoying the beauty of nature. At the hanok village, you can experience the lifestyle of Joseon through the houses, the furniture, and everyday objects that represent the resident’s social class. On the stage behind Cheonugak Pavilion, traditional music, dance, and martial arts are performed frequently for visitors. At the traditional arts and craft hall, you can see various products made using traditional Korean crafts.

Daegu’s Seomun Market

Daegu

Daegu’s Seomun Market

Daegu

The largest wholesale market in Youngnam area Youngnam region is used to designate the southern area between ‘Jukryeong” and “Joryeong” at Korean Sobaek Mountain Range. Daegu Seomun Market is the largest in this area by far. Daegu Seomun Market was deemed as one of three largest markets during the Joseon Dynasty, and became Seomun Market in the 17th century, moving from the outskirts of Northern Gate of Daegu city walls to the outside of the Western Gate after “Gyeongsang-gamyeong” was installed which the provincial governor administered. It was moved to the current location in 1922. The major product sold at Seomun Market is the fabric used to make clothes. The fabric wholesales have greatly contributed to the development of the area’s textile industry. In addition, with fabric suppliers and garment cutters available right inside the market, it is possible to have custom-made clothes as soon as possible. There is an underground shopping center in the District #2, and it has become a new attraction of Seomun Market, with many cafes opening up Tourists can find many of Daegu’s famous foods, including Gyeongsangbuk-do Province style foods such as napjak-mandu (flat Korean dumpling), ggoma-kimbob (miniature cooked rice with stuffs inside wrapped in laver), maewun-odeng (spicy fishcake), and kalguksu, (fresh noodles inside seafood soup). The flat mandu always perks up visitors’ curiosity with its unique shape, and bite-size miniature kimbob is everyone’s favorite. With the opening of the night market since 2016, Seomun Market has led new trends and offered a variety of entertainment and fun to all visitors. It is easily accessible by Daegu Subway Line #3.

Jagalchi Market

Busan

Jagalchi Market

Busan

Jagalchi Market The Largest Fish Market in South Korea Among many places to visit in the Busan area, the most popular marketplace is definitely Jagalchi Market! There are a number of theories on how its unique name came to be. One theory says that the name came from a jagal, or gravel field, which surrounds the area, starting in Chungmu-dong of Busan. The other speculates that Jagalchi originated from the word ending for many fish, which sounds like ‘-chi’, such as neopchi, meaning flatfish, samchi, or Japanese mackerel, and galchi, or cutlass. In the beginning, the market was just a group of street vendors lined up along the waterfront. However, after the construction of a modern building, shaped like a group of seagulls, it became an indoor market, protected from the cold winter wind and equipped with underground parking lots. On the ground level, there are freshly caught fish, king crabs, lobsters and numerous kinds of seafood. The second floor houses stores selling dried fish and other types of seafood, along with restaurants that offer ocean views, welcoming many visitors. When getting off at Jagalchi Station on Subway Line One in Busan, the entrance to the market is only a minute away. Visitors can also drop by other famous landmarks in the area, such as Gukje, or Nampodong International Market, Bupyeong Kangtong Market, and the Movie Street of Busan’s International Film Festival. These have become the must-see places for tourists who want to fully enjoy all that Busan has to offer. If you take a short, five-minute walk near Jagalchi Market, you can even see Yeongdodaegyo, the first bascule or drawbridge in Korea. Every day at two P.M., Yeongdo Bridge is raised, so passersby can watch. The latest popular spot is the observation deck of Jagalchi Market. Take an elevator to the roof of the seventh floor. Then, climb the stairs leading to the observation deck. Through binoculars, visitors can see the entire cityscape, including Namhang Pier and the Yeongdo District of Busan. This is one of the best places to see downtown Busan and Yongdusan Park.

Dongdaemun Market

Seoul Jongno-gu

Dongdaemun Market

Seoul Jongno-gu

Dongdaemun Wholesale Fashion Market Korea’s Fashion Hub Conveniently located between Dongdaemun Station on Line 1 and Dongdaemun History & Culture Park Station on Line 4 of the Seoul Subway, it is easy to get to Dongdaemun Market, Korea’s fashion hub. Dongdaemun Apparel Wholesale Market, which is found in the commercial area of Dongdaemun, was created by the merchant association of eight smaller markets: Pyounghwa Market, Tongil Arcade, Shin Pyounghwa Fashion Town, Fashion Nam Pyounghwa, Dong Pyounghwa Fashion Town, Techno Town, Kwanghee Fashion Mall, and Belpost. Each market offers specific items, ranging from women’s and men’s apparel to fashion accessories. The variety adds flavor to your shopping. The area also provides competitively-priced goods and services for many international shoppers. Dongdaemun Design Plaza, a well-known landmark nearby, is another place to enjoy your time in Dongdaemun. There, you may even have a chance to watch one of the popular fashion shows held in the area. Although it is busy during the daytime, the area is filled with its most vibrant energy at night. Each market opens at different hours. In between trips to the bustling markets, look for the numerous stores and food stalls nestled in the spaces between buildings, and grab a bite to ease your hunger. Looking for a new outfit? Let’s head to Dongdaemun, the market that never sleeps, and pick out something that looks great on you!

Jeju’s Dongmun Market

Jeju-do Jeju-si

Jeju’s Dongmun Market

Jeju-do Jeju-si

The top market of Jeju Island, the three-time winner of UNESCO’s Clean Nature Award Dongmun Market, the oldest in Jeju Island, is located between Jeju International Airport and Jeju International Passenger Terminal. Located in the heart of Jeju’s downtown, it is a favorite among Jeju residents and tourists alike. At the market, it is possible to purchase Jeju’s regional products such as tangerines and “Hallabong” all year round. Since the names and products of these citrus fruits all differ by harvest seasons and locations, be sure to ask before purchasing some. This is also the best place to try local specialty such as omegi-ddeok (rice cake), jayeonmom-guk (gulfweed soup), and bing-ddeok (Jeju style buckwheat pancake). Customer Service Center offers the market map and foreign language assistance service, making the tourists’ market experience both easy and convenient. Jeju Island, where Jeju Dongmun Market is located, is the world natural heritage registered at UNESCO, which offers many wonderful attractions. There are Jeju Confucian Temple and Yongdu-am Rock near the market where the line of tourists know no end. A little bit farther away from the market, visitors can enjoy Teddy Bear Museum, green tea tree farms, AquaPlanet, and Seongsan Sunrise Peak.

Gukje Market

Busan

Gukje Market

Busan

A market with the modern and contemporary history of Korea After the National Liberation on August 15, 1945, the Japanese started a temporary market (irregular market) to sell off their belongings before they headed home after their defeat in the World War II. The market continued to grow in scale, and in 1948, it became a market called, “Jayu Market.” During the Korean War, many refugees sought livelihood in this market and sold American military and relief supplies. Since the 1950’s, it has been called Gukje Market because products from Korea, Japan, and the US got together and transacted here. These days, Gukje Market has become one of Busan’s largest markets and sells second-hand clothes, tools, and industrial products imported from other countries. Along Gukje Market’s Tool’s Alley, there are many hardware retail and wholesale stores carrying various kinds of tools, and there is a store that became the background of the film, “Ode to my Father.” There are some shops at the Gukje Market that offers tax breaks. Simply look for shops with the ‘Global Tax Free’ sticker attached. There are many famous snacks to be enjoyed at the market. They include: yubujumeoni, (fried tofu pockets), mul-ddeok (water rice cake), and bibim-dangmyeon (bibim clear noodles). You can also give Korean desserts a try by visiting shops that sell old-fashioned red bean sherbet during summer and hot red bean paste porridge in winter.

Gangneung Coffee Street

Gangwon-do Gangneung-si

Gangneung Coffee Street

Gangwon-do Gangneung-si

Gangneung Coffee Street Ocean views lend an aura of romance to a stretch of coffee roasteries Anmok Beach is a favorite among couples on romantic outings who want to enjoy a cup of coffee by the sea. The coastal road spans 500 meters, beginning from the entrance of Gangneung Harbor to Anmok Sunrise Park, and there are more than 20 cafés set up along the beach. In the 1980s, Anmok Beach was famously called a "street café" because several coffee vending machines were placed along the beach. It was a favorite haunt for couples who came to enjoy the view of the ocean along with a small cup of coffee. Although it came from a vending machine, rumor had it that it tasted like fine coffee thanks to the lovely seaside surroundings. Gradually, the vending machines were replaced by cafés serving freshly brewed coffee, leading to the coffee street that it’s become today. The cafés along the coastal road are each filled with the fragrant aromas of their own signature blends. The shops include roasteries run by talented professionals, as well as famous café franchises. All of the fine establishments are decorated with handsome façades and lovely interiors and decked with seaside windows so that customers can enjoy their coffee while gazing out at the ever-changing view of the ocean. If you want to step outside for some fresh air, you can take your coffee to go and stroll along the shore. Or find a spot on the beach and feel the breeze as you sip your coffee and enjoy the charming seaside location.

Eunwolsa Temple

Ulsan Nam-gu

Eunwolsa Temple

Ulsan Nam-gu

Sometimes, we call certain people “bigger” than others. We call them bigger when they act calm and rational even in the face of events that would make most of us overly emotional. What if there was a person who was so much “bigger” than everyone else, he even impressed ghosts? According to one episode in the “Tales of Cheoyong,” an evil spirit that was spreading sickness and disease met someone who made it repent for its past transgressions. That someone was Cheoyong, the son of the Dragon King. One day, King Heongang, the 49th monarch of Shilla, traveled to Gaeunpo (today’s Ulsan) on a retreat. But suddenly, the weather turned and the entire realm became overcast with dark clouds and fog. Frightened at the thought that he may have angered the Dragon King, King Heongang built a Buddhist temple. Pleased with King Heongang’s offering, the Dragon King introduced King Heongang to his seventh son, Cheoyong. Cheoyong was soon appointed to the position of Geupgan, upon which he helped King Heongang rule his kingdom. He even married the most beautiful woman in all of Shilla. However, one day, Cheoyong witnessed something devastating when he returned home. He saw his wife was in bed with someone other than himself. Despite catching his wife committing adultery, Cheoyong kept his temper, came back outside, and began to sing and dance. The song and dance Cheoyong performed was called “Cheoyongmu” And was designated as a UNESCO intangible heritage in 2009. Surprised by Cheoyong’s reaction, the evil spirit begged for forgiveness. It promised never to do anything bad in a location with Cheoyong’s picture. Thereafter, people posted pictures of Cheoyong’s face on their front doors. Today, you can still visit the place where, according to legend, the Dragon King and Cheoyong first appeared It is at a rock (the “Cheoyongam”) sitting 150m off the coast of Sejuk Village in Hwangseong-dong, Nam-gu (Ulsan-si).

Gyeongju Gyochon Village

Gyeongsangbuk-do Gyeongju-si

Gyeongju Gyochon Village

Gyeongsangbuk-do Gyeongju-si

[Woman] I’m planning a trip to Gyeongju. Do you have any places that I absolutely should not miss? [Man] Right...you’re looking for some recommendations. Let me think for a bit. Hey, what comes to your mind when you think of a trip to Gyeongju? [Woman] When it comes to Gyeongju, I know that it has Seokguram, Bulguksa Temple, and a lot of other heritage sites. [Man] You’re right. Gyeongju does have plenty of heritage sites with significant historical value. If you plan your trip to Gyeongju as a historical tour, it might be a little more fulfilling. What kind of city do you think Gyeongju is? [Woman] More than anything else, Gyeongju is a city of aristocrats. [Man] That is correct. But did you know that Gyeongju is a city of romance? (Pause) Did you know? [Woman] Don’t be ridiculous. Gyeongju and romance don’t seem to match. [Man] No, they actually do match! Gyeongju is home to a surprising number of historical and romantic sites.If you're dreaming of a sweet and romantic experience like the flowers fluttering in the spring breeze, follow me to the Gyochon Village in Gyeongju. Introduce Gyochon Village and its ties to Shilla [Man] Gyochon Village in Gyeongju was home to “Gukhak,” the first national university of Shilla built during the reign of King Sinmun. Gukhak of Shilla, later on, became Hyanghak in Goryeo, and Hyanggyo during the Joseon Dynasty. The reason why the village is called “Gyo-dong,” “Gyochon” or “Gyo-ri” is because it has a Hyanggyo inside the village. [Woman] In other words, Gyochon Village in Gyeongju was like the eight competitive school districts in Seoul. But their roots go back to Shilla, not Joseon. That’s amazing. [Man] That’s right. A few years ago, Gyeongju, Ulsan, and Pohang joined forces under the “Sunrise Alliance” to carry on the legacy of Shilla which was built across a thousand years. Historically, Ulsan and Pohang used to protect Seorabeol and the kingdom against Japanese pirates looking to raid the country through the sea. Thanks to their dedication, Shilla was able to unify the three kingdoms and survive for a thousand years despite being the smallest country in the region. [Woman] Wait a minute. Now I’ve come to think about it, I have never heard of a royal palace or palatial ruins belonging to Shilla, despite the fact that the kingdom went on for a thousand years. [Man] Oh.. I suppose that’s true. Where did you go on your school excursions? [Woman] My school excursions...they were such a long time ago...I think I went to Gyeongju when I was in high school. [Man] Well then, you would have seen the palatial ruins that belonged to Shilla.. Gyeongju Travel Spot 1: Wolseong District [Man] Do you see that hill with all the trees next to Cheomseongdae Observatory? That’s Wolseong District. It’s the place where all the royal palaces were during the Shilla Dynasty. In other words, it was the center of Gyeongju back then. Thanks to its historical value, the district has been designated as Historic Site No. 16. The name “Wolseong” comes from the fact that the palace site is shaped like a half-moon. That is why the district is also known as “Banwolseong (half-moon palace).” [Woman] I thought the palatial ruins of Shilla would feature some grand palaces. But I don’t seem to see any. [Man] You’re right. Unfortunately, we only have the foundations today. At first, the palaces were built near Changnimsa Temple Site, right underneath Namsan Mountain. During the reign of King Pasa (the 5th monarch of Shilla), the palaces were relocated here. [Woman] What a pity. It would've been so great to see the palaces today. [Man] Don’t worry. I’ll take you to an even better place.Now, you might be able to see a long forest stretching north from Wolseong.That forest is called “Gyelim.” [Woman] Wow. It’s such a dense forest. I feel like all the fine dust would be filtered away there. [Man] Although it might look like an ordinary forest, it is an extremely important place. Gyelim is where Kim Al-ji was born. Kim Al-ji was the man who created the Kim clan, a powerful family that was famous for producing the largest number of monarchs during the Shilla Dynasty. [Woman] Kim Al-ji? Even his name seems special. I bet there’s a story about his name. [Man] You’re quick, aren’t you? The story behind Kim Al-ji’s name can be found in the History of the Three Kingdoms. One day, a bright light began pulsating in Gyelim.So, a man went to check the light source. There, he discovered a handsome baby boy inside a golden chest. Since then, people started calling the forest “Gyelim.” With regards to the boy, he came from a golden (“geum”) chest, so people gave him a surname that sounded similar: “Gim (later on Kim).” [Woman] You know, people who appear in these legends become king. Did he become a king? [Man] It seems a lot of them do. But Kim Al-ji himself did not become king.It was his great-great-great-great-grandson that became a member of the Kim clan that became the monarch of Shilla (King Michu).Starting with King Michu, the Kim family produced a staggering 38 monarchs for the Shilla Dynasty. [Woman] 38 monarchs? My god! They must have been an extremely powerful royal family. [Man] They guarded Gyelim as a sacred place and banned anyone from cutting down any trees from the forest. [Woman] Now that I’ve learned the history behind Gyelim, it feels a little scary. [Man] Okay. I’ll show you a place that is a little more romantic. Shall we go? Gyeongju Travel Spot 2: The love nest for Wonhyo and Princess Yoseok - Yoseokgung Palace [Woman] Wow. A romantic spot in Gyeongju. I’m so curious. [Man] The place I’m talking about is the Yoseokgung Palace, which is home to the beautiful love story between Wonhyo and Princess Yoseok. The story goes like this. King Muyeol of Shilla had a daughter, Princess Yoseok. But during a battle against Baekje, Princess Yoseok lost her husband. King Muyeol was sad to see his daughter heartbroken. After all, he was as much of a father as he was the king of his country. According to court rules, he could not move his widowed daughter back into the royal palace, so he had her live in a palace near Wolseong Yoseokgung Palace. [Woman] Doesn’t Yoseokgung Palace have something to do with Wonhyo, the Buddhist monk? [Man] You’re absolutely right. This is where the love affair between Wonhyo and Princess Yoseok began. [Woman] A romantic love affair between a monk and a princess. That’s exciting. [Man] There’s a song that Wonhyo supposedly sang for the princess. Shall we take a listen? [Wonhyo] “Someone give me an ax without a handle. I’ll make a column that props up the heavens. Using that ax without a handle, I plan to make a column that props up the heavens.” [Woman] Those lyrics aren’t romantic at all! [Man] You’ll feel different if you dig a little deeper into the meaning of those lyrics. Here, an ‘ax without a handle’ means the widowed Princess Yoseok, and the ‘column that props up the heavens’ means a great person that will help the kingdom thrive. [Woman] I see..… now it seems that way. I want to know more about Wonhyo! [Man] Wonhyo established some of the key philosophies of Buddhism in Korea such as “Ilcheyushimjo (everything depends on the mind)” and “Hwajaengsasang (principle of harmony).” At the time, Buddhism was the official religion of the kingdom. Nevertheless, common people did not understand the religion all that well. Wonhyo popularized Buddhism among the masses. [Woman] I can’t believe such a prominent monk would fall in love with a woman and serenade her like that. [Man] ‘Someone give me an ax without a handle.I’ll make a column that props up the heavens.’ You too? You don’t have to. It’s no wonder Princess Yoseok fell for a man who serenaded her with a special love song. How did they meet? According to history, Wonhyo always looked like a beggar.Despite his appearances, the royal family and Buddhist worshipers recognized him and invited him to lead a Buddhist ceremony. [Woman] Then, did Princess Yoseok fall in love at first sight with Wonhyo at the royal Buddhist ceremony? [Man] That’s right. It was rare for a monk to appear at a royal Buddhist ceremony. Princess Yoseok saw how honest Wonhyo was, and fell immediately in love. Soon, she became lovesick. When King Muyeol saw his daughter suffering, he summoned Wonhyo into the palace. [Woman] I assume Wonhyo, the beggar that he is, didn’t comply with the King’s request so easily? [Man] You’re right. When he saw the court officials approach with the king’s decree, Wonhyo fell into Muncheongyo. He used his wet clothes as an excuse to step into Yoseokgung Palace where Princess Yoseok was staying, instead of the royal palace where King Muyeol was waiting for him. [Woman] They were so deeply in love, the entire area around Yoseokgung Palace supposedly smelled like flowers for a while. But unfortunately, their love didn’t last. [Woman] Why not? [Man] After a while, Wonhyo had to leave.He broke the rules as a Buddhist monk, so he put his Buddhist robe away and became a commoner. 10 months after Wonhyo left, Princess Yoseok gave birth to a boy. That boy grew up to be Seolchong, the genius scholar who invented Idu script.As his lyrics said, Wonhyo helped bring a ‘column to prop up the heavens’ into this world. [Woman] Wow. Love stories are always so interesting I think I should call Gyeongju the city of love. Gyeongju Travel Spot 3: The love nest for Wonhyo and Princess Yoseok - Woljeonggyo Bridge [Man] Hey Suji, did you know that Woljeonggyo Bridge has become a popular place for couples when they go on a date? [Woman] I’ve heard that the view from Woljeonggyo Bridge is magnificent! [Man] In the evening, the soft lights come on, and create a romantic ambiance. If you get a chance, visit Woljeonggyo Bridge at night! Gyeongju Travel Spot 4: Gyeongju Hyanggyo and Old Family House of the Choi Clan [Man] We’ve seen Woljeonggyo Bridge. So now, it’s time to head over to the Gyochon Village in Gyeongju. Can you guess why Gyochon Village is also known as “Gyo-dong” or “Gyochon”? [Woman] That’s because it has a Hyanggyo inside the village! [Man] You remembered.As I mentioned earlier, Gyochon Village in Gyeongju was home to Gukhak, the first national university in Korea built during the reign of King Sinmun.Gukhak evolved into Hyanghak during the Goryeo Dynasty, and eventually into Hyanggyo during the Joseon Dynasty. Naturally, people created an aristocratic village nearby. [Woman] That’s why the village was created. Their legacy carries on to this day. I thought the village was simply a collection of traditional Hanok homes that belonged to aristocratic families. Now that I know the reason why it was created, the village seems more dignified. [Man] At the time, Gyochon Village had houses with blue tiled roofs and refined scholars. So, most people wanted to move into the village. [Woman] I think I can hear some aristocrat calling out at the door, “Is there anyone at home?” [Man] Haha... Gyochon Village has several old houses that belonged to the Choi clan. It has a great environment to see what Gyeongju looked like culture-wise during the Joseon Dynasty.One of the reasons why Gyochon Village become so famous is because it had the Choi family mansion. Supposedly the Choi family was the richest family in all of Joseon. [Woman] I’ve heard of the mansion before! The Choi family mansion! It’s the family that was extremely charitable to other poor neighbors. Right? [Man] You’re so smart! Throughout the family’s 400-year history, the Choi clan produced court officials for eight generations and remained one of the richest families for 12 generations. They were the wealthiest family during the Joseon Dynasty.There’s another story I want to add to the list of good deeds they did for the community. Whenever the country suffered from a poor harvest, the Choi family did not eat rice. either. People say, that the Choi family would cook porridge and share it with the entire village. [Woman] They seem to be the embodiment of noblesse oblige. I’m really impressed. [Man] I have another story about the Choi family. The last prominent descendant of the Choi clan was Choi Joon. During the Japanese colonial rule of Korea, Choi Joon funded the Provisional Government of Korea. Despite ruling Korea with an iron grip, the Japanese could not ignore the wealth and reputation of the Choi family that had stood the test of time for hundreds of years.After our country won its independence, Choi Joon donated his money to help educate talented individuals.Although they do not enjoy the immense wealth held before, the reputation of the family still lives on. [Woman] They truly are the quintessential example of noblesse oblige during the Joseon Dynasty. [Man] A few years ago, they restored their guest house which was lost to a fire in the 1970s.If you walk past the guest house, you’ll arrive at a storage building that is larger than a typical house.The Choi family used to be so rich, they could fill the entire storage unit with food. People say, the Choi clan donated all of it to the community. [Woman] I think the leadership the Choi clan showed us gave us an opportunity to appreciate the value of sharing and wisdom our ancestors believed in. I think it will be a good lesson for our children as well. Gyeongju Travel Spot 5: Traditional Liquor of Gyeongju [Man] Do you like to drink? [Woman] I do. [Man] We came all the way to the mansion of the Choi clan. It would be a shame to leave without having some traditional local liquor, right? This is called Gayangju. Made with water sourced from the old mansion of the Choi family, they used to send Gayangju to the king as tribute.This traditional Gyeongju liquor is made with the roots of Chinese matrimony vine that are more than 100 years old. It has a subtle aroma and an amazingly smooth taste! [Woman] It seems smooth but honest! Just like the values the Choi family used to believe in. [Man] So, we took a tour around Gyochon Village in Gyeongju. What did you think? [Woman] I feel like I took a time machine back into the past. It was so fun. I learned about stories hidden behind your history. It was a truly meaningful trip. The more you know, the more meaningful your trip can be. We’ll come back with more stories to make your trip across Gyeongju more exciting. [Together] History Tour of Korea! Thank you for joining us.

Bomun Tourist Complex

Gyeongsangbuk-do Gyeongju-si

Bomun Tourist Complex

Gyeongsangbuk-do Gyeongju-si

If Donggung Palace and Wolji Pond are places that represent historical Shilla, Bomun Tourist Complex and Bomunho Pond are places that represent the modern Gyeongju. As its name suggests, Wolji Pond can offer a beautiful view of the moon reflected on its surface at night. On the other hand, Bomunho Pond can show you different elements of each season in Gyeongju. Although it is a joy to visit all year round, Bomunho looks particularly striking in spring and autumn. Bomun Tourist Complex features a hotel, resort, and other amenities in addition to Donggungwon (a modern recreation of Donggung Palace and Wolji Pond) and Gyeongju World (a popular theme park for children). The complex offers a variety of attractions for all visitors. Meanwhile, Bomunho Pond has a nice trail along its circumference called “Bomunhoban-gil (Bomunho Trail).” If you walk at a leisurely pace, it takes 90 minutes to complete the course. But the trail offers some spectacular views, so it may take a little longer than that. This could be the reason why so many people like to return to Bomunho. In fact, every city has that type of place. Ulsan has Ulsan Grand Park, and Pohang has its Greenway Railroad Forest. Meanwhile, Myeonghwalsan Mountain, which lies to the west of Bomunho Lake, has a mountain fortress that protected Seorabeol (the capital city of Shilla). During emergencies, the fortress served as a temporary palace for the King. During the reign of Queen Seondeok (the 27th monarch of Shilla), Crown forces quelled the rebellion led by Bidam at Myeonghwalsan Mountain. Unlike today, it was a battlefield that determined life or death. The mountain no longer has that legacy. Today, Myeonghwalsan Mountain and Bomun Tourist Complex have turned into great places for rest and recuperation. Over time, Gyeongju became a peaceful city, and peacefulness created the foundation upon which Bomun Tourist Complex can offer different shades of colors during each season.

Bomunjeong Pavilion

Gyeongsangbuk-do Gyeongju-si

Bomunjeong Pavilion

Gyeongsangbuk-do Gyeongju-si

Have you ever tried to catch cherry blossoms fluttering in the spring breeze? If you have, where was the best place you saw cherry blossoms? Or, are you still looking for a great place to see and enjoy them? If so, we have the perfect place for you. This place was introduced on CNN, a famous news network in the US, as one of the best places to see cherry blossoms in Korea. Next to a modest pond called Bomunho inside Gyeongju Bomun Tourist Complex, there is a small pavilion known as Bomunjeong. In January 2012, world-famous news channel CNN ranked Bomunjeong Pavilion at No. 11 on the list of ‘50 beautiful places to visit in South Korea’ through its tourism and travel website, CNN Go. In spring, Bomunjeong and its pond become shrouded in cherry blossoms. In summer, lotus flowers fill Bomunho Pond, while beautiful leaves surround the pavilion to create some truly stunning views. Unlike typical cherry trees found in other areas where the branches grow upwards, the cherry trees near Bomunjeong Pavilion have willowy branches that hang over the surface of Bomunho Pond. In spring, when flowers bloom along those willowy branches, Bomunjeong Pavilion looks magical. Surprisingly, when the municipal government in Gyeongju originally built Bomun Tourist Complex, Bomunjeong Pavilion was not a particularly popular feature. However, as the cherry trees grew enough to produce spectacular cherry blossoms, the newly built pavilion went viral. Photos of Bomunjeong spread through various SNS platforms, and soon the pavilion became a popular attraction. Every year, during the cherry blossom season, photographers flock to Bomunjeong Pavilion. How about creating a few unforgettable memories on a special day out in Bomunjeong this spring?

N Seoul Tower

Seoul Yongsan-gu

N Seoul Tower

Seoul Yongsan-gu

A Landmark of Seoul Built in 1975, N Seoul Tower stands on top of Namsan Mountain. N Seoul Tower was originally a radio wave tower built to transmit TV and Radio waves. The tower was opened to the public in 1980, and it has since become one of Seoul’s most famous attractions. The tower measures 236 meters (774 feet) in height. If you add the height of Namsan Mountain, the tower stands at 479.7 meters (1573.8 feet) above ground. Take the high speed elevator to reach the observatory in just 30 seconds. The colorful video art on the ceiling of the elevator will make you feel like you walked into another world! The observatory has glass walls, giving you a 360o view of Seoul. On a clear day, you can see as far as Yongmunsan Mountain in Yangpyeong to the east, Hangang River and the Yellow Sea to the west, Namhansanseong Fortress to the south, and Songaksan Mountain in North Korea to the north. The restaurant above the observatory is famous among couples, and it completes a full 360o turn every 90 minutes. The outdoor observation platform, which is often featured in Korean dramas and shows, has hundreds of padlocks hanging on the fence. Countless visitors attach their locks here every day. You can also write your name and a lock and hang it here!

Insa-dong

Seoul Jongno-gu

Insa-dong

Seoul Jongno-gu

The Streets of Tradition Insa-dong is one of the most popular attractions for international tourists visiting Seoul, because it’s probably the best place in the city to see the combination of traditional and modern Korea. During the Joseon Dynasty, a small village not far from Insa-dong was home to Dohwaseo, a government office in charge of illustrating royal processions and events. Many of the employees of Dohwaseo lived in and around the area. However, after the decline of the Joseon Dynasty the office was closed and the workers lost their jobs. Later, their descendants started selling artworks and even the tools used to draw or paint them on the streets of Insa-dong. Gradually they established a market dealing in antique arts and crafts, and that’s how the area became the center of traditional culture and art. Of all the many streets and alleys of Insa-dong, Ssamziegil is the busiest shopping street. Although it's called a street, the name actually refers to the hallways of a four-story shopping center with over 70 stores. The shopping center is worth a visit because in addition to the stores selling traditional handicrafts and souvenirs, there are also galleries and tea shops. There is a basement floor as well, where you can make your own pottery, Korean paper and ceramic products. Opposite Ssamziegil, you'll find a narrow alley. Walk up the alley a short way, and you’ll come across the Insa-dong Tourist Information Center. Also called the Insa-dong PR Center, the main role of this center is to provide information about local stores and restaurants. Besides providing useful information, the center offers free tea and you can also try on royal costumes or the uniform dress worn by the court ladies of the Joseon Dynasty. Above all, the places not to be missed in Insa-dong are the small, private galleries with unique paintings, stationery shops selling traditional everyday necessities and Korean paper, and antique shops. If you would like to try a delicious cup of traditional Korean tea, you may choose to patronize any one of the traditional tea shops and tea houses along the street. In the streets of Insa-dong, you'll get to enjoy the harmony existing between the traditional and the modern.

Seoul Museum of History

Seoul

Seoul Museum of History

Seoul

A Time Travel to the Past The Seoul Museum of History offers its visitors a glimpse into the history of Seoul, the capital city of Korea. The museum shows how the city has transformed by exhibiting relics of days gone by. The exhibits at the museum are divided into four main themes: Seoul during the Joseon Dynasty, Seoul during the Korean Empire, Seoul during the Japanese Occupation, and Seoul as one of the fastest growing cities in the world. The first section of the museum consists of a permanent exhibition hall entitled ‘Seoul of the Joseon Dynasty’. This exhibition explains why the founders of the dynasty chose Seoul to be their capital city, and shows what the city looked like when Korea opened up to the world for the first time in its history. In this hall, you’ll see photos and videos of Gwanghwamun Square when it was called Yukjogeori many decades ago, Bukchon, an area home to the elite of the old dynasty, as well other outposts of the capital, situated outside the gates of the walled city. The second exhibition hall, entitled ‘The Capital of the Korean Empire’ shows how the city transformed after opening up to the world and accepting western influence. You’ll see photos of people getting on trams and using electrical appliances for the first time in their lives. The next exhibition hall is called ‘Seoul under Japanese Control’. This hall highlights the plight of Seoul residents who struggled to cope with enforced Japanese culture whilst fighting for their independence after Japan’s Annexation of Korea in 1910. The fourth and last exhibition hall is entitled ‘The Development of Seoul’. This section shows the transformation of the city after liberation from Japan in 1945 and the exhibition continues until 2002, when the country hosted the FIFA World Cup. Here, you’ll see both a city in ruins after the Korean War and one of the world’s largest, developed cities. One of the most popular attractions of the museum is the ‘City Model Image Hall’ on the third floor. This hall includes a 1:1,500 scale model of Seoul and videos created by some of the latest IT technology. You will be able to see Seoul and the buildings within the city in minute detail. If you want to learn more about Seoul, use the ‘Find Seoul’ system in the corner of the hall. It’s quite helpful if you want to find your way around the city. The Seoul Museum of History is the place to go if you want to learn more about Seoul.

Songdo Hanok Village

Incheon Yeonsu-gu

Songdo Hanok Village

Incheon Yeonsu-gu

Friendly Hanok Village in downtown Dad: Don’t you think a Korean traditional house, Hanok, lingers on your mind? In particular, Hanok village, which has Hanok hotel, restaurants, cultural experience facilities, event facilities and souvenir shops, makes you experience the past in this modern days. Daughter: It really does. Experiencing Hanok Village in the downtown of Incheon allows visitors to experience the past, present and future that are connected with each other. Dad: Yes. I hope there are more places to experience Korean traditional houses in the center of the city. Daughter: You’re right. Many visitors from abroad can take the pic of the day here with the beauty of Korea.

G-Tower Sky Park

Incheon Yeonsu-gu

G-Tower Sky Park

Incheon Yeonsu-gu

Dazzling panorama of Songdo Dad : This place is called G-Tower where several executive offices of International Organizations including Incheon Free Economic Zone Authority (IFEZA), Green Climate Fund (GCF), UN agency and etc. are located. Let’s go to the Observatory on the 33rd floor of G-Tower where you can see a panoramic view of Songdo. Daughter : Wow, I can see every part of Songdo just at a glance like what you said. Every place we’ve been to looks so small. There is Central Park, Hanok Village, Compact-Smart City and Tri-bowl. Dad : Isn’t the view different from what see saw below? Because of a fine view you can enjoy up here, you can see amazing sunset and nightscape here in G-Tower. Daughter : Oh, Dad! I see a long bridge over there. Dad : That’s the Incheon Bridge. It is the biggest and longest bridge in Korea that connects Songdo International Business District and Yeongjongdo Island. In addition, the G-Tower has space for VR-ZONE, ECO-ZONE, and Multi-Room where you can experience virtual reality. You will know easily about Songdo there. Daughter : Wow, let me try it! Dad : Careful not to suffer from motion sickness after doing it too much.

Suanbo Hot Springs

Chungcheongbuk-do Chungju-si

Suanbo Hot Springs

Chungcheongbuk-do Chungju-si

Suanbo Hot Springs Suanbo Hot Springs was the first naturally erupted hot spring among the many hot springs in South Korea. This means it’s a hot spring where thermal water naturally gushes out from the earth without an artificial drilling process. The quality of the thermal water is first grade. This is because it erupts naturally at a high temperature of 53℃ from 250m below ground, and is colorless, odorless and flavorless clean natural thermal water with weak alkaline of 8.3 acidity. Suanbo Hot Springs is traditionally known as having remedial effects for skin diseases, etc. because it includes various minerals that are beneficial to human bodies. In Joseon wangjo sillok(Annals of the Joseon Dynasty) designated as a UNESCO Memory of the World, there is a record that says King Taejo(Yi Seong-gye, r. 1392-1398) went to Suanbo to treat his malignant skin disease. There is a record in the Cheongpung hyanggyoji(Cheongpung Local Confucian School Newspaper), a historical record, which says King Sukjong(r. 1674-1720) enjoyed the hot springs at Suanbo and recuperated there. Thus, Suanbo Hot Springs is also known as the “King’s Hot Springs.” The thermal water of Suanbo Hot Springs is managed directly by Chungju-si to control and preserve its quality. The best quality thermal water can be used at any facility that has a thermal water usage permit within the Suanbo Hot Springs area. If circumstances don’t allow you to bathe in the hot springs, then visit Multang Park. There is a foot bath area called Naganjeong where travelers can rest for a while and recover from fatigue.

Jeju National Museum

Jeju-do Jeju-si

Jeju National Museum

Jeju-do Jeju-si

The history and culture of Jeju Jeju National Museum Here at Jeju National Museum, you can see Jeju’s unique geographical features, culture, history, and heritage. Let’s head back to the prehistoric age. Jeju National Museum is the figuration of traditional thatched house. It contains various materials about its unique culture and history, and more than 7,000 remains. The museum is consisted of six exhibition rooms; Prehistory room, Tamra room, Goryeo room, Tamrasunsyukdo room, Joseon room, and Donation room. The Prehistory room is where you can learn about the birth of Jeju, the settlement process of the first Jeju residents, and development of culture before Tamra. The Tamra room reveals the birth of Tamra and exchanges with its surrounding nations. In the Tamrasunsyukdo room, you can see treasure No. 652-6, Tamra Sullyeokdo, illustrating the governor of Tamra, Lee Hyung Sang. This picture book gives us an opportunity to look at Jeju, three hundred years ago The records and articles of so-called drifters and the exiled are among items we need to see. 'Pyo Hae Rok' is a story about drifters who were on their way to take the civil service test but became lost due to the wind and waves and drifted to Okinawa. Along with Pyo Hae Rok, copies of the Journal of Hendrick Hamel, exiles of Kim Jung, Song Siyul, Kim Jung Hee, Choi Ikhyun and their keepsakes are regarded as something interesting. The clothes and tools of female divers, shamanistic faith, and remains are the last part of the museum. However, this is not the end. Children’s Olle, an experience center allows children to experience history and the ability to make a rubbing or wood board printing. Furthermore, the museum holds various special exhibitions, permanent ones, culture classes, experience events, and performances as well. Jeju National Museum operates meaningful and useful programs and provides materials. This is a precious museum to learn about Jeju.

Cheonjiyeon Waterfall

Jeju-do Seogwipo-si

Cheonjiyeon Waterfall

Jeju-do Seogwipo-si

Cheonjiyeon Waterfall: A Natural Wonder Even the Sky Fell in Love With There are many waterfalls with vigorous water streams pouring down from steep rugged cliffs in Jeju. Among them, Cheonjiyeon Waterfall is definitely the best in terms of with size and scenic view. ■ Introduction of Cheonjiyeon Waterfall Seogwipo Harbor, Various Rugged Cliffs with Rock Formations, Various Vegetation, Dense Forest, Contents of Jeungbotamraji Let the images drift away) As you start your way up from the old Seogwipo Harbor, you will reach the waterfall boasting a magnificent view with its rugged cliffs and fantastic rock formations. A luxuriant forest of diverse subtropical evergreen and fern trees covers the area. The <Jeungbotamraji>, drawn up by 12 Jeju scholars right after Korea regained independence, explains about Cheonjiyeon very well. It praises the beauty of Cheonjiyeon as follows: “It is located at Yeonwoecheon stream, about 2km to the west of Seogwi-ri, Seogwipo. The double waterfalls flow quickly as if it would fly away. It is approximately around 30.3 m long. It has quiet and secluded feelings to it as it is very close to the ocean, yet surrounded by hills and mountains.” Cheonjiyeon Waterfall inside the valley, which is 1 km long, with a height of 22 m, a width of 12m, and the water depth of 20 m, pours down between fantastic rocks as if it would pierce right into the earth’s axis. You will feel chills even in the summer time. The area around Cheonjiyeon Waterfall is designated and protected as a Nature Reserve to protect the original form of nature. Accordingly, any activity of logging, collecting plants, or capturing wild animals is prohibited. ■ Things you should not miss – Subtitles IN The Dense Forest at Cheonjiyeon Waterfall Things you should not miss at Cheonjiyeon Waterfall that boasts a picturesque view. Dampalsu Trees (Ellipticus Elaeocarpus) First, Dampalsu trees, or Ellipticus elasocarpus~! Dampalsu tree is a subtropical tree. In Korea, Dampalsu trees are only found in Jeju Island, as they cannot survive in the cold. The wild Dampalsu trees around Cheonjiyeon Waterfall area have been designated as a Natural Monument No. 163 Giant Mottled Eel Things you should not miss at Cheonjiyeon Waterfall Second, giant mottled eel~! It is a southern tropical fish that grows into as big as 2 m of body length. The habitats of giant mottled eel range from Jeju, southern part of Japan, and to Southeast Asia. They are classified as a Natural Monument No. 27. ■ Epilogue Cheonjiyeon Waterfall pours down so quickly between high cliffs and dense forest as if it would fly away. It is a natural wonder even sky would fall in love with.

Manjanggul Cave

Jeju-do Jeju-si

Manjanggul Cave

Jeju-do Jeju-si

Everything about Lava Tunnels, Manjanggul Cave Located in Gimnyeong-ri, Gujwa-eup, the world’s longest lava tunnel Manjanggul Cave which was known as ‘Manjangee cave’ by the locals, was revealed to the world only in 1958. Various lava tube tunnel structures make Manjanggul Cave appear even more mysterious. The significant value of the cave was recognized and was designated as a UNESCO World Natural Heritage in 2008. In 1962, Manjanggul Cave was designated as Natural Monument No. 98 along with Gimnyeongsagul Cave. It is 8,928 m long with a width of up to 23 m and a height of up to 30 m. From 1977 to 1986, a Korea-Japan joint investigation on Manjanggul Cave was executed. A natural cave created by the sinking activity of lava, Manjanggual Cave has a variety of interesting structures inside including stone pillars and stalactites that make a splendid world-class view. It will be no exaggeration to say that it is a lava tunnel museum. Moreover, Manjanggual Cave possesses significant academic values, as it is a habitat for various rare species such as bats, earth centipedes, Sinopoda koreana, Nesticella brevipes, mites, and blue-green and green algae. Only certain parts of Manjanggul Cave are open to public. The other parts are open for academic purposes only. Must-see things at Manjanggul Cave! First, the Stone Turtle~! The Stone Turtle shaped just like Jeju Island is a lava boulder representing Manjanggual Cave. It definitely is one of the best masterpieces lava ever created. A lava boulder refers to a rock that dropped from the tunnel’s ceiling while lava was flowing until the rock stopped at some point. The Stone Turtle is assumed to have been created as hot lava was stuck to the corner of the stopped lava boulder. In short, it shows the mystique of lava tunnels. Must-see things at Manjanggul Cave! Second, lava columns~! They are created as lava which had flowed down to the floor from the ceiling hardened and piled into column-shapes. Such lava columns are found in many lava tunnels, but the 7.6 m high lava column in Manjanggul Cave is known to be one of the largest one in the world. Some of the lava flowed from the ceiling had flowed into both direction of the floor and formed structures of lava toes. The lava tunnel formed together with a volcano hundreds of thousands of years ago, Manjanggul Cave holds a mystique of Jeju Island. You can find everything about a lava tunnel at Manjanggul Cave. (Subtitles - UNESC certificate)

Seogwipo Maeil Olle Market

Jeju-do Seogwipo-si

Seogwipo Maeil Olle Market

Jeju-do Seogwipo-si

Seogwipo Maeil Olle Market A Market Tour in Jeju Style Seogwipo Maeil Olle Market is the largest market in Seogwipo City. The traditional market was naturally formed in the early 1960s, with about 60 years of history behind it. As it became a part of Course No. 6 of Jeju Olle Trails, it changed its name to “Seogwipo Maeil Olle Market.” The word “Olle” is a small trail leading from the main road to your house, in Jeju dialect. The parking lot located in the market can accommodate 500 cars at once, and offers 30 minutes of free parking, so there is no need to worry about parking when going into the market. The environmentally-friendly waterway constructed along the alleys of the market provides an attractive resting spot. When looking up at the ceiling while shopping, visitors will be able to see the giant canvases portraying the beautiful scenery of Jeju. Great photographs depict a waterfall of Jeju in each of the four seasons. Seogwipo Maeil Olle Market offers tours of various Jeju specialties and traditional dishes. Furthermore, the market offers free shipping for customers for their purchases to the place of their choice. Outdoor stages and parks along the way are great places to watch various performances and visit festivals, especially for the young, the future of market. Please come and enjoy!

2017 PyeongChang House

Gangwon-do Gangneung-si

2017 PyeongChang House

Gangwon-do Gangneung-si

2018 PyeongChang House Become a Winter Olympics expert The 2018 PyeongChang House can be found in front of the Gangneung Green City Experience Center. It provides a wide range of information about the Olympic events, and documents the activities that helped bring the 2018 Winter Olympics to Pyeongchang County. The Olympic mascots Soohorang and Bandabi greet visitors at the entrance to the Promotional House. Soohorang, a white tiger that symbolizes Korea, is the mascot for the PyeongChang Winter Olympic Games. “Sooho” is the Korean word for “protection,” because the safety of the Olympic athletes, participants and guests is of the utmost importance. “Rang” comes from the Korean word for “tiger” and also refers to “Jeongseon Arirang,” the most famous folk song in Gangwon-do Province. Meanwhile, the mascot for the PyeongChang Paralympic Winter Games is Bandabi, an Asiatic black bear that symbolizes Korea and Gangwon-do Province. Bandabi represents courage and strength of will. The name comes from the Korean words “ban-dal”, or “half-moon” like the crescent shape on the Asiatic black bear’s chest, and “bi” which refers to commemorating the competition. Bandabi cheers on the paralympic athletes who push themselves beyond their own limits. Once inside, you can see the card used by Jacques Rogge, the former president of the International Olympic Committee, to announce Pyeongchang as the next host of the Winter Olympic Games. Life-like sculptures depict athletes from each Olympic sport in dynamic poses, gripping ski poles and wearing goggles, helmets and other accessories that were used by former and current members of the national teams. A wide range of exhibits and videos offer a detailed look at the 15 categories and 102 events planned for the PyeongChang Winter Olympics. Docents can also provide visitors with explanations to help them better understand the preparations that went into the Winter Games, including how the sports facilities and emblems were created. On top of all this, you can even try your hand at ice hockey shooting. And the 4D Experience Hall next door lets you use realistic VR simulations to get a taste of some of the Olympic events for yourself, like ski jumping, bobsleighing and alpine skiing.

Odaesan Seonjae-gil Trail

Gangwon-do Pyeongchang-gun

Odaesan Seonjae-gil Trail

Gangwon-do Pyeongchang-gun

Odaesan Seonjae-gil Trail A forest road leading to the world of the Buddha Odaesan Seonjae-gil Trail lies between two temples -- Woljeong-sa and Sangwon-sa. Here, echoes of Buddhist scriptures resonate amid the beauty of nature. "Seonjae" is the protagonist of the Avatamsaka Sutra from Buddhist scriptures. He goes on a pilgrimage for enlightenment with the guidance of Munsu, the Bodhisattva of wisdom. Here, you can forget your troubles for a while and walk upon this road, with only yourself for company. Seonjae-gil Trail begins with Sunhwan-gil, a path that starts at the parking lot of Woljeong-sa Temple and circles back from Iljumun Gate. In the past, the trail began in the road behind the temple, but this has changed since the fall of 2016. Along the way, thousand-year-old fir trees form a tunnel that seems to connect our world with the realm of the Buddha. At the end of the path returning to the parking lot, you will come upon the ancient Woljeong-sa Temple, built by the monk Jajang Yulsa (590-658) during the Silla Dynasty (57 BC-935 AD). Once inside, you will see an octagonal nine-story pagoda (National Treasure No. 48-1) and the stone statue of a seated bodhisattva (National Treasure No. 48-2). A side path from Woljeong-sa Bumjongru leads you to the start of the main Odaesan Seonjae-gil Trail. The path follows the clear waters of Odaecheon Stream across the valley before turning into the forest. The series of dirt roads and wooden walkways make for a varied and enjoyable walk through the beautiful scenery.